Digital Literacy Bootcamp

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Digital Literacy supported by iventure AFRICA Response Innovation Lab through a partnership with Danish Refugee Council

 Cash-based transfers are increasingly used by humanitarian actors to support refugees and their host communities rather than in-kind aid. These transfers are sometimes operated through mobile money. However, many recipients of this assistance have low levels of literacy, are first-time users of digital wallets, and may not be very comfortable using mobile phones. In an effort to ensure that these communities can manage their finances and be able to adequately and safely use these transfer services, it is critical to address the challenge linked to the low digital literacy levels in these communities. The Danish Refugee Council (DRC), the anchor partner for this track on digital literacy was looking for solutions to improve and accelerate trainings for members of refugee communities. The successful solutions were expected to encourage peer-learning amongst users for broader uptake. The competing teams spent time in the Kyaka refugee settlement in Western Uganda to learn about the needs of the refugees and develop solutions tailored solutions.

 

"While we had to choose one winner, we truly believe that all the ideas have matured and are able to apply user centric design to meet the needs of underserved communities.” -Charlène Cabot, Manager, Response Innovation Lab.

 

The Challenge Process

 

The Innovation Challenge process that led to a final pitch competition started with 150 nationwide applications submitted in September 2020. Startup Uganda evaluated the applications and selected 10 startups under each innovation track, that then qualified to the bootcamp stage.

 

Working with United Social VenturesMakerere Innovation and Incubation CenterStarthub Africa and Iventure Africa, (all Startup Uganda members) the teams underwent a rigorous virtual three-day bootcamp after which they pitched to a panel of judges consisting of UNCDF staff and the respective anchor partners. This process led to a shortlist of three teams under each track:

 Final Pitch Competition 

The nine teams tussled it out in a final pitch competition on 21 May 2021 at Design Hub in Kampala. The judges (four for each track) consisting of subject matter experts from the anchor partner organizations assessed the solutions in a live pitch competition based on their ability to address the problem presented, the ability to address challenges faced by underserved communities and the sustainability model of the innovation.

Digital Literacy Bootcamp

Cash-based transfers are increasingly used by humanitarian actors to support refugees and their host communities rather than in-kind aid. These transfers now are sometimes operated through mobile money. However, many recipients of this assistance have low levels of literacy, are first-time users of digital wallets, and may not even be very comfortable using mobile phones. In an effort to ensure that these communities can manage their finances and be able to adequately and safely use these transfer services, the challenge around low digital literacy levels needs to be addressed. The Danish Refugee Council (DRC), our anchor partner is looking for solutions to improve and fast trainings on digital literacy.

The digital solutions should equip recipients with digital skills, help them with basic financial management and tips on how to best use their mobile wallets. The partner expects that the most successful solutions will be those that encourage peer-learning amongst community members for broader uptake.

The Danish Refugee Council, anchor partner under Digital Literacy, was looking for solutions to fast track large scale community based training on digital literacy. There has been an increase in the use of cash-based transfers to support refugees and their host communities rather than in-kind aid. These transfers now also include mobile money. In an effort to ensure that these communities can manage their finances and be able to adequately use these transfer services, the challenge around low digital literacy levels needs to be addressed.